Why are the Writing Staff thankful for The Learning Hub?

The month of November is time to take stock and reflect, and is also a chance to think about the various things you’re thankful about this year. At this point in the semester, most of us are aching for that two day break and a chance to visit with friends and family back home, but it’s also important to recognize the hard, good work you’ve done so far in your classes.

The Learning Hub’s staff is celebrating what we’re thankful for this month in a series of videos – today our Writing Staff share why they are thankful for The Hub!

Are you thankful for The Learning Hub? Would you like to take part in a video featuring students later this month? Come to the front desk and have a chat with us! We’d love to have you participate in our Web Series this month!

The Truth Behind Tutoring: How NOT to Roast Your Students (part 2)

The Roast of Sarah Collins was all fun and games, but what is tutoring really like in The Hub? Lisa and Kris, our new Writing Specialists, are here to discuss what students bring to the tutoring session in the second part of this vlog series.

Make an appointment in The Learning Hub to get help with your coursework! Call (217) 206-6503, email thehub@uis.edu, stop in to BRK 460, or check out the online form on our website at http://www.uis.edu/thelearninghub today!

The Truth Behind Tutoring: How NOT to Roast Your Students (part 1)

The Roast of Sarah Collins was all fun and games, but what is tutoring really like in The Hub? Lisa and Kris, our new Writing Specialists, are here to discuss what tutors actually do for students during a tutoring session in the first part of this vlog series.

Make an appointment in The Learning Hub to get help with your coursework! Call (217) 206-6503, email thehub@uis.edu, stop in to BRK 460, or check out the online form on our website at http://www.uis.edu/thelearninghub today!

 

The Learning Hub’s Official Roast of Sarah Collins

We’ve been working on this project for the last several weeks, and the time has finally come to show it to you. The writing staff of The Learning Hub have put together our first official roast – and our first victim is our Writing Coordinator, Sarah Collins.

The writing tutors (present and former) were given a paper Sarah wrote for her freshman composition class, and were told to do their worst. The result is this video – enjoy!

So what’d you think? Share the roast with the hashtag #hubroast, comment down below, and stay tuned to see Lisa and Kris’ rebuttal! They’re going to talk about what tutoring in The Hub is actually like – trust us, we will not roast you!

Student Hacks! 3 Easy Strategies to Get Ahead (part 3)

This month in The Learning Hub we’ve been collecting various “student hacks” or tips and tricks to help you be successful in your classes this semester. Today, we’re bringing you our last three – read on to check them out!

hack my life kevin GIF by truTV

1. Microsoft Templates

Did you know that Microsoft has templates for all of their platforms (Word, Excel, Publisher, PowerPoint) that can help you to streamline your coursework and projects? Find some at this link, but also just Googling things will help you find lots of community-created resources absolutely free to you!

Who doesn’t love a good template??

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2. Export to the right file format

Are you using Google Docs or Pages or another word processor other than Microsoft Word? Does your professor require you to turn in documents in Word format (.doc or .docx)? Never fear! While you do have access to Word through Office365 for free as a UIS student, you don’t have to download the software to still be able to turn in documents in the right format for your classes.

Both Google Docs and Pages have “Export” or “Download as” functions that allow you to save out your project in the right file format. Just go to “File” and then find either “Download as” (for Google) or Export (for Pages) and save the document somewhere you can locate it on your computer. You won’t be able to open it, but you can upload it to Blackboard or wherever you need to for your courses.

chris pratt mind blown GIF by Omaze

3. Skim your test first

Are you a nervous test taker? Do you feel like you take too little or too much time to answer all of the questions? Here’s a step that can help you to prioritize your test and make the most of your time:

Before you write anything down, look over the test in its entirety. Check out each question to see what you’re being asked to do. Chances are, one question may build on another question so you may figure out an answer to an earlier question based on how a later question is worded. Chances are, you may see a question that’s still fresh in your mind from studying it, so you can answer it right then and there before you forget all the necessary information.

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Don’t feel obligated to answer the test in order, and don’t feel obligated to put pen or pencil to paper right away when the professor hands you the booklet or test packet. Take stock of the test and review what you need to do so you can plan out how best to tackle it when you do then start writing.


We hope you’ve enjoyed this third and final group of three Student Hacks! Please let us know what you think, and if you need additional help, don’t be afraid to make an appointment in The Learning Hub! Our contact information is below:

The Learning Hub

Brookens Suite 460

(217) 206-6503

thehub@uis.edu

www.uis.edu/thelearninghub

Student Hacks! 3 Easy Strategies to Get Ahead (part 2)

This month in The Learning Hub we’ve been collecting various “student hacks” or tips and tricks to help you be successful in your classes this semester. Today, we’re bringing you our next three – read on to check them out!

hack my life kevin GIF by truTV

1. Keyboard Shortcuts

Do you spend a ton of time using your mouse to click the various buttons in Word or your browser, like cut, copy, and paste? Do you struggle to create hanging indents and other formatting features in your papers because you have to navigate through several menus of options?

Hey – here’s a trick for you. There’s totally keyboard shortcuts for pretty much everything you can do in Word, and there are lots of keyboard shortcuts for other stuff, too, like your browser, Adobe software, and lots more. Try them on for size to make your time more productive, effective, and efficient!

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For quick reference, here’s a few keyboard shortcuts that you’ll likely use for every homework or writing assignment you tackle:

  • Control+C (Cmd+C for Mac) is Copy
  • Control+V (Cmd+V for Mac) is Cut
  • Control+P (Cmd+P for Mac) is Paste

And my very favorite, magical keyboard shortcut is for the pesky hanging indent (the formatting for citations where the first line is “flush” with the left margin and the subsequent lines are indented in half an inch). Just click into your fully-formed citation or click and drag to highlight it, then hit “Control+T” (Cmd+T for Mac) to automatically format citations into a hanging indent. Amazing!

2. Color Coding

If you aren’t already taking advantage of many study techniques out there to make your reading, studying, and test-taking easier, you should really consider it! There’s a ton of research out there, and lots and lots of tactics. Try out a few and see which ones you like best.

One that seems to never fail, though, is definitely color coding. Create a color code system for your note-taking and studying that is the same for every class. It will help you to, at a glance, know what you already know, what you need to look up, and what you should spend the most time on.

journaling sharpie markers GIF by Sharpie

Create that color code system, then actually use it. You’ll be so much happier (and more studious) for it!

3. Test Tactics

Do you have test anxiety? Do you get to class, feeling prepared, and then the second the professor lays the test down in front of you you freeze and forget everything you know? Try this on for size for any tests where you will need to memorize information, like formulas for math tests or dates and other factoids for a history test.

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When you are studying, do your best to memorize those things. Just before your test, do everything you can to have them in your head. Then, when your professor drops the test down in front of you, quickly turn it over or find a blank spot to regurgitate all of that information for future reference. Dump it down so that you can refer back to it as you then begin taking the actual test.

There’s no shame in putting those formulas or factoids there for yourself, just in case you’ll need them. Then you won’t have to spend so much brain power keeping the formulas or factoids in your head – you’ll be able to spend it instead on how to actually answer the specific questions of the test.


We hope you’ve enjoyed this second group of three Student Hacks! Please let us know what you think, and if you need additional help, don’t be afraid to make an appointment in The Learning Hub! Our contact information is below:

The Learning Hub

Brookens Suite 460

(217) 206-6503

thehub@uis.edu

www.uis.edu/thelearninghub

Student Hacks! 3 Easy Strategies to Get Ahead

This month in The Learning Hub we’ve been collecting various “student hacks” or tips and tricks to help you be successful in your classes this semester. Today, we’re bringing you our first three – read on to check them out!

hack my life kevin GIF by truTV

1. Chew gum.

Did you know that the flavor of gum you chew can really help you with your study habits? It’s true! Here’s two specific ways you can use gum to do better in your coursework:

A) Chew the same flavor of gum when you’re studying and when you take the test.

Research has shown that chewing the same flavor during study time and during exam time helps you link you test-taking brain to your studying-brain and retain the information better.

unimpressed uh huh GIF by Brooklyn Nine-Nine

B) Chew different flavors of gum for each of your subjects to differentiate them in your brain.

If you find that the above tactic actually does work for you, and want to try it for all of your classes, make sure that you use different flavors of gum for each subject so you don’t get them all confused and mixed up in your brain as you try to take the tests and remember your studying!

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2) Listen to music.

If you aren’t a person who can sit in silence and read pages and pages of your coursework at a time without feeling like you’re suffering, try listening to some music. Avoid music with lyrics/vocals, as it can harm your concentration. Instead, try out instrumental music like film scores or classical or other artists who don’t include singing.

Research has shown that instrumental music can actually improve your concentration. And we won’t lie, we always feel like badasses when listening to a particularly good movie soundtrack!

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3) There’s an app for that.

Did you know that many of your favorite studying/school sites also have apps for free? Check if your favorite or most frequently used school-related websites (Quizlet, BlackBoard, Google Docs/Drive) have an app for your smart phone, tablet, or computer.

Having the app on-the-go with you can help you to accomplish small tasks, like looking up due dates or reading assignments for a class, testing yourself really quickly between engagements before you have a test, or sending a document off for your tutoring appointment. Use those apps to your advantage so you’re an efficient and effective student!doctor who app GIF

PS If you don’t already know, UIS students have access to Office 365 for free by visiting go.uis.edu/office365 and logging in, then clicking the “Install Office Apps” dropdown on your profile page.

PPS If you also don’t already know, UIS students have access to 50 gb of free storage on Box, the official cloud storage system for our campus. Check it out by going to uofi.box.com and setting up your account.

PPPS If you really didn’t already know, UIS students can log on to Google Drive with their UIS email and password. Go to drive.google.com and log in with your UIS credentials, and you can then have your school documents separate from your personal uploads.


We hope you’ve enjoyed these first three Student Hacks! Please let us know what you think, and if you need additional help, don’t be afraid to make an appointment in The Learning Hub! Our contact information is below:

The Learning Hub

Brookens Suite 460

(217) 206-6503

thehub@uis.edu

www.uis.edu/thelearninghub